Slow Fashion Steps Forward: How COVID-19 is impacting the Textile Industry

SLOW FASHION STEPS FORWARD: HOW COVID-19 IS IMPACTING THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY

SLOW FASHION STEPS FORWARD: HOW COVID-19 IS IMPACTING THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY


The current COVID-19 pandemic has made a massive impact on the global economy, and, more specifically, the textile industry. With business owners facing a variety of issues due to the losses and adaptations that are necessary during this time, the approaches and strategies that can be utilized are multiple.


Many key players of the industry are stepping forward to assist in various ways, including the manufacturing of personal protective equipment, such as masks like Christian Siriano and Georg Maier are doing in the US and Germany respectively. Here is a list of some of the more common practices that can be used to handle this difficult situation.

The current COVID-19 pandemic has made a massive impact on the global economy, and, more specifically, the textile industry. With business owners facing a variety of issues due to the losses and adaptations that are necessary during this time, the approaches and strategies that can be utilized are multiple.


Many key players of the industry are stepping forward to assist in various ways, including the manufacturing of personal protective equipment, such as masks like Christian Siriano and Georg Maier are doing in the US and Germany respectively. Here is a list of some of the more common practices that can be used to handle this difficult situation.

Personal protective equipment COVID-19 masks being produced in textile factories

SLOW FASHION STEPS FORWARD: HOW COVID-19 IS IMPACTING THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY

01



The current COVID-19 pandemic has made a massive impact on the global economy, and, more specifically, the textile industry. With business owners facing a variety of issues due to the losses and adaptations that are necessary during this time, the approaches and strategies that can be utilized are multiple.


Many key players of the industry are stepping forward to assist in various ways, including the manufacturing of personal protective equipment, such as masks like Christian Siriano and Georg Maier are doing in the US and Germany respectively. Here is a list of some of the more common practices that can be used to handle this difficult situation.

Personal protective equipment COVID-19 masks being produced in textile factories

02


NON-ESSENTIAL SPENDING IS BEING CUT, MAKING WAY FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF GUERRILLA MARKETING TACTICS


In 2019, for the first time in history, more money was spent on digital than on non-digital advertising. Classified under "guerrilla marketing" in the past, yet common-place today, the initiative and creativity needed to market a brand has increased.


The time to put those more extravagant, yet less expensive, ideas into play is upon us. Creating direct connections with potential clients and existing clientele in a time where most of the world is less and less physically connected requires far more innovation and creativity. 


Yet, when done correctly, it can be an exceptionally effective way to get exposure and establish direct relationships with consumers in these exceptional times. By creating a memorable experience for customers, these tactics are far more likely to impact those who interact with them, and thereby reach further into their networks, too.

NON-ESSENTIAL SPENDING IS BEING CUT, MAKING WAY FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF GUERRILLA MARKETING TACTICS


NON-ESSENTIAL SPENDING IS BEING CUT, MAKING WAY FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF GUERRILLA MARKETING TACTICS


In 2019, for the first time in history, more money was spent on digital than on non-digital advertising.Classified under "guerrilla marketing" in the past, yet common-place today, the initiative and creativity needed to market a brand has increased.


The time to put those more extravagant, yet less expensive, ideas into play is upon us.Creating direct connections with potential clients and existing clientele in a time where most of the world is less and less physically connected requires far more innovation and creativity. 


Yet, when done correctly, it can be an exceptionally effective way to get exposure and establish direct relationships with consumers in these exceptional times. By creating a memorable experience for customers, these tactics are far more likely to impact those who interact with them, and thereby reach further into their networks, too.

In 2019, for the first time in history, more money was spent on digital than on non-digital advertising.Classified under "guerrilla marketing" in the past, yet common-place today, the initiative and creativity needed to market a brand has increased.


The time to put those more extravagant, yet less expensive, ideas into play is upon us.Creating direct connections with potential clients and existing clientele in a time where most of the world is less and less physically connected requires far more innovation and creativity. 


Yet, when done correctly, it can be an exceptionally effective way to get exposure and establish direct relationships with consumers in these exceptional times. By creating a memorable experience for customers, these tactics are far more likely to impact those who interact with them, and thereby reach further into their networks, too.

One of the things to bear in mind is that one would want to intercept an audience in a unique way and capture their attention irrefutably, advises Evy Lyons, vice president of marketing at Traackr. 


Creating a custom AR filter for social media platforms, just like Dior did when they released their new range of sunglasses, allows fashion brands to still interact with their customers and potential customers in a way that is still safe but innovative. 

One of the things to bear in mind is that one would want to intercept an audience in a unique way and capture their attention irrefutably, advises Evy Lyons, vice president of marketing at Traackr. 


Creating a custom AR filter for social media platforms, just like Dior did when they released their new range of sunglasses, allows fashion brands to still interact with their customers and potential customers in a way that is still safe but innovative. 


Acting as a teaser for their release in February 2019, this AR filter on Instagram Stories allowed users the experience of trying on a pair of the glasses. This filter has clocked over 50 million impressions. This cost-effective, yet creative method, generates a connection between the brand and users. 


That said, both Instagram and Spark AR (the software that allows creators to develop filters) have asked staff to leave their offices due to the virus, so there will likely be a delay in the approval of new filters in the coming month.

One of the things to bear in mind is that one would want to intercept an audience in a unique way and capture their attention irrefutably, advises Evy Lyons, vice president of marketing at Traackr. 


Creating a custom AR filter for social media platforms, just like Dior did when they released their new range of sunglasses, allows fashion brands to still interact with their customers and potential customers in a way that is still safe but innovative. 


Acting as a teaser for their release in February 2019, this AR filter on Instagram Stories allowed users the experience of trying on a pair of the glasses. This filter has clocked over 50 million impressions. This cost-effective, yet creative method, generates a connection between the brand and users. 


That said, both Instagram and Spark AR (the software that allows creators to develop filters) have asked staff to leave their offices due to the virus, so there will likely be a delay in the approval of new filters in the coming month.

One of the things to bear in mind is that one would want to intercept an audience in a unique way and capture their attention irrefutably, advises Evy Lyons, vice president of marketing at Traackr. 


Creating a custom AR filter for social media platforms, just like Dior did when they released their new range of sunglasses, allows fashion brands to still interact with their customers and potential customers in a way that is still safe but innovative. 


Acting as a teaser for their release in February 2019, this AR filter on Instagram Stories allowed users the experience of trying on a pair of the glasses. This filter has clocked over 50 million impressions. This cost-effective, yet creative method, generates a connection between the brand and users. 


That said, both Instagram and Spark AR (the software that allows creators to develop filters) have asked staff to leave their offices due to the virus, so there will likely be a delay in the approval of new filters in the coming month.

One of the things to bear in mind is that one would want to intercept an audience in a unique way and capture their attention irrefutably, advises Evy Lyons, vice president of marketing at Traackr


Creating a custom AR filter for social media platforms, just like Dior did when they released their new range of sunglasses, allows fashion brands to still interact with their customers and potential customers in a way that is still safe but innovative. 


Acting as a teaser for their release in February 2019, this AR filter on Instagram Stories allowed users the experience of trying on a pair of the glasses. This filter has clocked over50 million impressions. This cost-effective, yet creative method, generates a connection between the brand and users. 

That said, both Instagram and Spark AR (the software that allows creators to develop filters) have asked staff to leave their offices due to the virus, so there will likely be a delay in the approval of new filters in the coming month.

IncreasES IN Digitalization ACROSS ALL SECTORS

Fashion design schools have been pushed into the future, as they have had to adapt into operating on a digital scale. 


Online classrooms, such as the one pictured below from the DeTao Masters Academy, have been adopted by textile schools in China since January of 2020, as they took this crisis as an opportunity to innovate old-fashioned teaching methods and realign them with the needs of an industry that is rapidly moving towards digitization. 


Students were able to begin attending on-screen pattern-cutting classes and watch knitting demonstrations from their tutors. On a multi-screen chat, students were able to share their knitting progress while receiving real-time feedback from teachers too. Patrick Gottelier, who runs the fashion design undergraduate program there, agrees that the online experience cannot perfectly replicate the studio, but has taken the approach of being able to focus more on the hands-on side of learning. As students do not access the machines supplied, they are learning many techniques first-hand before they will have a chance to automate them.


As the textile industry sees technology become more and more integrated towards digitalization, (for example, by GHERZI and Li & Fung to mention two), especially within the present-day-pandemic, these students will be well-equipped for the modern world.  

IncreasES IN Digitalization ACROSS ALL SECTORS

Acting as a teaser for their release in February 2019, this AR filter on Instagram Stories allowed users the experience of trying on a pair of the glasses. This filter has clocked over 50 million impressions. This cost-effective, yet creative method, generates a connection between the brand and users. 


That said, both Instagram and Spark AR (the software that allows creators to develop filters) have asked staff to leave their offices due to the virus, so there will likely be a delay in the approval of new filters in the coming month.

Fashion design schools have been pushed into the future, as they have had to adapt into operating on a digital scale. 


Online classrooms, such as the one pictured above from the DeTao Masters Academy, have been adopted by textile schools in China since January of 2020, as they took this crisis as an opportunity to innovate old-fashioned teaching methods and realign them with the needs of an industry that is rapidly moving towards digitization. 


Students were able to begin attending on-screen pattern-cutting classes and watch knitting demonstrations from their tutors. On a multi-screen chat, students were able to share their knitting progress while receiving real-time feedback from teachers too. Patrick Gottelier, who runs the fashion design undergraduate program there, agrees that the online experience cannot perfectly replicate the studio, but has taken the approach of being able to focus more on the hands-on side of learning. As students do not access the machines supplied, they are learning many techniques first-hand before they will have a chance to automate them.


As the textile industry sees technology become more and more integrated towards digitalization, (for example, by GHERZI and Li & Fung to mention two), especially within the present-day-pandemic, these students will be well-equipped for the modern world.  

IncreasES IN Digitalization ACROSS ALL SECTORS

IncreasES IN Digitalization ACROSS ALL SECTORS

Fashion design schools have been pushed into the future, as they have had to adapt into operating on a digital scale. 


Online classrooms, such as the one pictured above from the DeTao Masters Academy, have been adopted by textile schools in China since January of 2020, as they took this crisis as an opportunity to innovate old-fashioned teaching methods and realign them with the needs of an industry that is rapidly moving towards digitization. 


Students were able to begin attending on-screen pattern-cutting classes and watch knitting demonstrations from their tutors. On a multi-screen chat, students were able to share their knitting progress while receiving real-time feedback from teachers too. Patrick Gottelier, who runs the fashion design undergraduate program there, agrees that the online experience cannot perfectly replicate the studio, but has taken the approach of being able to focus more on the hands-on side of learning. As students do not access the machines supplied, they are learning many techniques first-hand before they will have a chance to automate them.


As the textile industry sees technology become more and more integrated towards digitalization, (for example, by GHERZI and Li & Fung to mention two), especially within the present-day-pandemic, these students will be well-equipped for the modern world.  

Fashion design schools have been pushed into the future, as they have had to adapt into operating on a digital scale. 


Online classrooms, such as the one pictured above from the DeTao Masters Academy, have been adopted by textile schools in China since January of 2020, as they took this crisis as an opportunity to innovate old-fashioned teaching methods and realign them with the needs of an industry that is rapidly moving towards digitization. 


Students were able to begin attending on-screen pattern-cutting classes and watch knitting demonstrations from their tutors. On a multi-screen chat, students were able to share their knitting progress while receiving real-time feedback from teachers too. Patrick Gottelier, who runs the fashion design undergraduate program there, agrees that the online experience cannot perfectly replicate the studio, but has taken the approach of being able to focus more on the hands-on side of learning. As students do not access the machines supplied, they are learning many techniques first-hand before they will have a chance to automate them.


As the textile industry sees technology become more and more integrated towards digitalization, (for example, by GHERZI and Li & Fung to mention two), especially within the present-day-pandemic, these students will be well-equipped for the modern world.  

DISCOUNTING

Especially in the retail sector, the mismanagement of inventory can fast mean that to sell off excess stock, many brands will to highly discount their offerings. Joe Kudla, CEO of activewear brand Vuori predicts that there will be “a heavily promotional environment in the next few months." But be wary of discounting in the long-term.

While this tactic may help boost sales in a short amount of time, it can also create bigger losses over longer periods, especially if percentages are pushed too far. In an approach to cope with the halt in sales, Bree McKeen, CEO of underwear brand Evelyn & Bobbie, has said that they will “not turn to online discounts to drive sales because of the negative impact that has on our boutique partners.” Instead, they are encouraging their customers to purchase gift cards instead.Founder of the DTC bag brand Caraa, Aaron Luo, acknowledges that, “If you start discounting, it sends the wrong message to the customers. 


You train them to only buy when stuff is on sale, and then your revenue tanks. So for many years, we’ve resisted the urge.” But, given the extraordinary circumstances, Caraa is offering a flash sale on a niche product - their washable anti-bacterial bag.“Now is the time to be really disciplined,” Kudla said. “You have to buy inventory conservatively and be very careful with pricing so that you don’t have unsold stuff sitting in a warehouse, but you’re also not devaluing the brand.”

DISCOUNTING

DISCOUNTING

Especially in the retail sector, the mismanagement of inventory can fast mean that to sell off excess stock, many brands will to highly discount their offerings. Joe Kudla, CEO of activewear brand Vuori predicts that there will be “a heavily promotional environment in the next few months." But be wary of discounting in the long-term.

Especially in the retail sector, the mismanagement of inventory can fast mean that to sell off excess stock, many brands will to highly discount their offerings. Joe Kudla, CEO of activewear brand Vuori predicts that there will be “a heavily promotional environment in the next few months." But be wary of discounting in the long-term.

While this tactic may help boost sales in a short amount of time, it can also create bigger losses over longer periods, especially if percentages are pushed too far. In an approach to cope with the halt in sales, Bree McKeen, CEO of underwear brand Evelyn & Bobbie, has said that they will “not turn to online discounts to drive sales because of the negative impact that has on our boutique partners.” Instead, they are encouraging their customers to purchase gift cards instead.Founder of the DTC bag brand Caraa, Aaron Luo, acknowledges that, “If you start discounting, it sends the wrong message to the customers. 


You train them to only buy when stuff is on sale, and then your revenue tanks. So for many years, we’ve resisted the urge.” But, given the extraordinary circumstances, Caraa is offering a flash sale on a niche product - their washable anti-bacterial bag.“Now is the time to be really disciplined,” Kudla said. “You have to buy inventory conservatively and be very careful with pricing so that you don’t have unsold stuff sitting in a warehouse, but you’re also not devaluing the brand.”

While this tactic may help boost sales in a short amount of time, it can also create bigger losses over longer periods, especially if percentages are pushed too far. In an approach to cope with the halt in sales, Bree McKeen, CEO of underwear brand Evelyn & Bobbie, has said that they will “not turn to online discounts to drive sales because of the negative impact that has on our boutique partners.” Instead, they are encouraging their customers to purchase gift cards instead.Founder of the DTC bag brand Caraa, Aaron Luo, acknowledges that, “If you start discounting, it sends the wrong message to the customers. 


You train them to only buy when stuff is on sale, and then your revenue tanks. So for many years, we’ve resisted the urge.” But, given the extraordinary circumstances, Caraa is offering a flash sale on a niche product - their washable anti-bacterial bag.“Now is the time to be really disciplined,” Kudla said. “You have to buy inventory conservatively and be very careful with pricing so that you don’t have unsold stuff sitting in a warehouse, but you’re also not devaluing the brand.”

An overall move toward slow fashion

Overly efficient supply chains and mass production to feed the current consumerist model have ensured that we have had enough to feed the demand under past circumstances. In response to what is likely to be a massive adjustment in consumer behavior over the coming period, the movement toward slow fashion is likely to become more and more of a necessity than a concept.

Slow fashion steps forward

This approach has inspired many changes in recent years, particularly in the production of clothing, and is set to continue doing so. Before the Industrial Revolution, garments were locally sourced and produced. More durable clothing that would last for a longer time was the order of the day, and clothing very much related to the geographic position that it was made in.


While not likely to be as drastic a change as a full revert to the ways of yesteryears, the current restrictions due to COVID-19 will certainly encourage consumers to buy fewer garments less often, of much higher quality, made from more sustainable processes. Indeed, with factories having to halt their production lines, there already has been a positive environmental impact with
air pollution in Asian countries dropping


Consumers are becoming more and more aware of the impact that the production of their item has, not only on the environment, but also on the health and wellbeing of those who are making their clothing. 


At THE GUESTLIST, the sustainability of what we do has always been our first and foremost priority. Our circular economy is built on the foundation of transparency and sustainability, and the health and financial wellbeing of our employees and staff are of utmost importance. In light of this, we have implemented measures to ensure that our customers and workers are guaranteed that production continues in the most sustainable way possible.


In a statement made by Anton Schumann, CEO of THE GUESTLIST, he reminds us that “In such times, the business models of the global fashion industry generally change abruptly... Customers will search the web directly for brands and manufacturers that can, and will, satisfy their needs. As the global crisis continues to hit fast-fashion, and provide opportunities for new and efficient business models, customers are starting to look for a valuable product that will accompany them for years.” 

An overall move toward slow fashion

An overall move toward slow fashion

Overly efficient supply chains and mass production to feed the current consumerist model have ensured that we have had enough to feed the demand under past circumstances. In response to what is likely to be a massive adjustment in consumer behavior over the coming period, the movement toward slow fashion is likely to become more and more of a necessity than a concept.

Overly efficient supply chains and mass production to feed the current consumerist model have ensured that we have had enough to feed the demand under past circumstances. In response to what is likely to be a massive adjustment in consumer behavior over the coming period, the movement toward slow fashion is likely to become more and more of a necessity than a concept.

Slow fashion steps forward
Slow fashion steps forward

This approach has inspired many changes in recent years, particularly in the production of clothing, and is set to continue doing so. Before the Industrial Revolution, garments were locally sourced and produced. More durable clothing that would last for a longer time was the order of the day, and clothing very much related to the geographic position that it was made in.


While not likely to be as drastic a change as a full revert to the ways of yesteryears, the current restrictions due to COVID-19 will certainly encourage consumers to buy fewer garments less often, of much higher quality, made from more sustainable processes. Indeed, with factories having to halt their production lines, there already has been a positive environmental impact with
air pollution in Asian countries dropping


Consumers are becoming more and more aware of the impact that the production of their item has, not only on the environment, but also on the health and wellbeing of those who are making their clothing. 


This approach has inspired many changes in recent years, particularly in the production of clothing, and is set to continue doing so. Before the Industrial Revolution, garments were locally sourced and produced. More durable clothing that would last for a longer time was the order of the day, and clothing very much related to the geographic position that it was made in.


While not likely to be as drastic a change as a full revert to the ways of yesteryears, the current restrictions due to COVID-19 will certainly encourage consumers to buy fewer garments less often, of much higher quality, made from more sustainable processes. Indeed, with factories having to halt their production lines, there already has been a positive environmental impact with
air pollution in Asian countries dropping


Consumers are becoming more and more aware of the impact that the production of their item has, not only on the environment, but also on the health and wellbeing of those who are making their clothing. 


At THE GUESTLIST, the sustainability of what we do has always been our first and foremost priority. Our circular economy is built on the foundation of transparency and sustainability, and the health and financial wellbeing of our employees and staff are of utmost importance. In light of this, we have implemented measures to ensure that our customers and workers are guaranteed that production continues in the most sustainable way possible.


In a statement made by Anton Schumann, CEO of THE GUESTLIST, he reminds us that “In such times, the business models of the global fashion industry generally change abruptly... Customers will search the web directly for brands and manufacturers that can, and will, satisfy their needs. As the global crisis continues to hit fast-fashion, and provide opportunities for new and efficient business models, customers are starting to look for a valuable product that will accompany them for years.” 

At THE GUESTLIST, the sustainability of what we do has always been our first and foremost priority. Our circular economy is built on the foundation of transparency and sustainability, and the health and financial wellbeing of our employees and staff are of utmost importance. In light of this, we have implemented measures to ensure that our customers and workers are guaranteed that production continues in the most sustainable way possible.


In a statement made by Anton Schumann, CEO of THE GUESTLIST, he reminds us that “In such times, the business models of the global fashion industry generally change abruptly... Customers will search the web directly for brands and manufacturers that can, and will, satisfy their needs. As the global crisis continues to hit fast-fashion, and provide opportunities for new and efficient business models, customers are starting to look for a valuable product that will accompany them for years.” 



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