Setting Sail into the Sunset with Cashmere

Setting sail into the sunset with cashmere

With the Italian Luna Rossa Prada Pirelli team gearing up for the 36th America’s Cup, the official sailing team jacket is featuring as an unorthodox star of the show. Supported byThe Woolmark Company, it caught the eye of many around the world, proving that style, sustainability and performance needn’t ever be compromised. The triple-layer jacket comprises of 54% Merino wool, bonded with a waterproof membrane with a water column of 11mm - for extreme water resistance and full breathability.


This leads us to think about how wool’s natural properties of superb breathability, wicking away moisture, and thermoregulation make it a great material to take to sea. Even more so, what attracted us to this unique garment was how it makes the move away from uniforms of synthetic fibers, towards a natural solution, with reduced environmental impact. 


Heading out onto the water for a day, an overnight excursion, some island-hopping on vacation, or even crossing oceans is as much about your vessel and your comfort as anything else. Here is a selection of three yachts that encompass the art of setting sail in some of the most stylish and lavish of ways, complementing your pieces from THE GUESTLIST perfectly.

Old-school class: Lady Moura

OUR COLLECTION PRIORITIZES CRAFTMANSHIP


Karim Guest New York and the collection of designers at THE GUESTLIST epitomize slow fashion that is gentler to the environment, supports social responsibility, and champions the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goal of sustainable consumption and production by 2030. Our collection prioritizes craftmanship, quality over quantity, and is created on a made-to-order basis.


When it comes to superyachts with authentic pedigree, few have as much blue blood as the 104.8m (344ft) Lady Moura. When she was delivered to her owners in 1990 by Blohm+Voss (the German Shipyard) the levels of design, innovation and onboard engineering were unprecedented. Built as a private residence instead of as a cruiser, the Lady Moura was cloaked in mystery to the outside world for three decades. Leading naval architect, Italian Luigi Sturchio, who styled the era’s finest yachts for Feadship, Benetti and Baglietto, was tasked with the design of the Lady Moura.

When it comes to superyachts with authentic pedigree, few have as much blue blood as the 104.8m (344ft) Lady Moura. When she was delivered to her owners in 1990 by Blohm+Voss (the German Shipyard) the levels of design, innovation and onboard engineering were unprecedented. Built as a private residence instead of as a cruiser, the Lady Moura was cloaked in mystery to the outside world for three decades. Leading naval architect, Italian Luigi Sturchio, who styled the era’s finest yachts for Feadship, Benetti and Baglietto, was tasked with the design of the Lady Moura.

Two fully equipped ICU units and a fulltime onboard doctor are not standard protocol on most superyachts. Neither are two galleys—one for the owner, the other for the crew—with up to six chefs and a separate bakery. And few superyachts spend the majority of their time running between Monaco and Palma with a permanent helicopter onboard. But conforming to the conventions of the world was never the Lady Moura’s priority. 

Two fully equipped ICU units and a fulltime onboard doctor are not standard protocol on most superyachts.  

When it comes to superyachts with authentic pedigree, few have as much blue blood as the 104.8m (344ft) Lady Moura. When she was delivered to her owners in 1990 by Blohm+Voss (the German Shipyard) the levels of design, innovation and onboard engineering were unprecedented. Built as a private residence instead of as a cruiser, the Lady Moura was cloaked in mystery to the outside world for three decades. Leading naval architect, Italian Luigi Sturchio, who styled the era’s finest yachts for Feadship, Benetti and Baglietto, was tasked with the design of the Lady Moura.

Neither are two galleys—one for the owner, the other for the crew—with up to six chefs and a separate bakery. And few superyachts spend the majority of their time running between Monaco and Palma with a permanent helicopter onboard. But conforming to the conventions of the world was never the Lady Moura’s priority.


When it comes to superyachts with authentic pedigree, few have as much blue blood as the 104.8m (344ft) Lady Moura. When she was delivered to her owners in 1990 by Blohm+Voss (the German Shipyard) the levels of design, innovation and onboard engineering were unprecedented. Built as a private residence instead of as a cruiser, the Lady Moura was cloaked in mystery to the outside world for three decades. Leading naval architect, Italian Luigi Sturchio, who styled the era’s finest yachts for Feadship, Benetti and Baglietto, was tasked with the design of the Lady Moura.

When meandering around onboard, even thirty years after her launch, the Lady Moura still has all her original flooring, carpets, walls and staircases. The silk walls in the guest cabins look as new as they did in 1990. Not even a new coat of paint has been required to spruce up Luigi Sturchio’s original interior colour scheme. The simple reason for this unusually high level of preservation is that, other than by immediate family, Lady Moura has barely been used. Her formal 24-seater dining room entertained guests just three times before the change in ownership — with the most recent occasion being to announce her sale.

LADY MOURA HAS THE FEEL OF A MODERN YACHT

Despite her age, Lady Moura has the feel of a modern yacht. Her beach club was considered revolutionary three decades ago and it still stacks up well against more contemporary superyachts. Positioned amidships with balconies both port and starboard, the club transformed how the owner could access the yacht from the water. The indoor pool with its retractable roof, gym, spa with sauna, and cinema complete the full complement of entertainment amenities.


The owner’s deck was also a novel concept. Reserved exclusively for family living, the floor contains six guest cabins, and a full-beam master suite. Generous walk-in wardrobes and two en suites pair with enough space for the owner to comfortably remain within his private quarters (as he did when the yacht became his permanent residence in 2018). Below-deck cabins, including a full-beam VIP, are reserved for non-family guests.

Steps to sustainability with Bravo Eugenia

Oceanco‘s  new 109m (357ft) Bravo Eugenia is a lean, green, sailing machine that’s destined to be a record-breaker. Indeed, she is a hybrid worthy of applause. While a growing number of vessels include hybrid engines, they are still rare on superyachts, just because of the sheer effort it takes to power boats of that size. But Bravo Eugenia is a sleek example of what can be done at the top of the gigayacht class. Launched in the fall, the custom boat is the first Oceanco to have the new LIFE (lengthened, innovative, fuel-efficient, eco-friendly) design, which combines progressive naval architecture with a clever hybrid-engine configuration.

The Dutch yacht builder partnered with renowned naval architects Lateral to bring the new super-yacht to fruition. The pair previously penned the pioneering Black Pearl—she can cross entire oceans without burning a skerrick of fossil fuel. Bravo Eugenia features a radical new hybrid propulsion system that purportedly uses 30 percent less fuel than her competitors. Coupled with new heat and energy-recovery systems, and integrated battery systems, this allows for optimal operation at all times. Not only are these pioneering systems extremely powerful, she boasts a reduction in fuel usage of up to 30 percent - meeting all existing ECO notation requirements. She is thereby permitted to operate in all emission control areas thanks to these diminished levels of emissions.


These feats have not gone unnoticed, indeed, she received the first ever “La Belle Classe Explorer Award” for Technology and Innovation presented by the Yacht Club of Monaco, as well as the coveted World Yacht Trophy Award for “Yacht of the Year” in the category of yachts over 82m in length.

Gone sailing on the Black Pearl

Also by Oceanco, the 106.7m (350 ft) Black Pearl is currently the largest and most technologically advanced sailing yacht in the world. 


Since her launch, Black Pearl has proven to be a new generation landmark sailing yacht with a unique identity. Not only is she the largest sailing yacht in the world, with her unique features - such as the state of the art DynaRig system, single level engine room, a hybrid propulsion installation and regeneration mode when under sail - she is set to turn heads the world over, for decades to come.

This three-masted sailing yacht is unlike any seen before. Her uniqueness and complexity are the realization of a discerning owner’s vision. She is the result of an elaborate and successful collaboration on the part of an international group of designers, engineers, naval architects, builders, and project managers. The designers, Ken Freivokh Design, Nuvolari Lenard and Villate Design all played a significant role in Black Pearl’s design evolution. Dykstra Naval Architects designed Black Pearl’s three 70 meter (230ft) DynaRig carbon masts and sailing systems. The sail area is subdivided into smaller lesser-loaded sails and they can be set or furled by the effortless ease of pushing a button. Astonishingly, all 2,900 square meters of sail can be set in 7 minutes. When under sail, Black Pearl is capable of reaching a top speed of 30 knots. Under motor, she sits at a comfortable 12 knots when cruising, and can reach a top speed of 17.5 knots.

Featuring a range of alternative power sources, and so this superyacht has the ability to cross the Atlantic using only 20 liters of fuel. One of these technologies is the yachts’ ability to generate electricity using just the propeller. When Black Pearl is under sail and generating enough hull speed, the blades on the propeller can be maneuvered into regeneration mode, which is then consumed by the electrical switchboard inside the yacht. In simple terms, the propeller can be used as a turbine to generate electricity.

Featuring a range of alternative power sources, and so this superyacht has the ability to cross the Atlantic using only 20 liters of fuel. One of these technologies is the yachts’ ability to generate electricity using just the propeller. 

When Black Pearl is under sail and generating enough hull speed, the blades on the propeller can be maneuvered into regeneration mode, which is then consumed by the electrical switchboard inside the yacht. In simple terms, the propeller can be used as a turbine to generate electricity.


A second power source is the solar panels built into the fabric of the sails, which allows the superyacht to generate energy while sailing. Black Pearl can also store any unused energy using large scale batteries and heat capture technologies. Nigel Gee collaborated with Oceanco to create Black Pearl’s hybrid propulsion system as well as other onboard systems such as waste heat recovery. It's no mystery that this incredible superyacht won the Sailing Superyacht of the Year Award for 2019.

A second power source is the solar panels built into the fabric of the sails, which allows the superyacht to generate energy while sailing. Black Pearl can also store any unused energy using large scale batteries and heat capture technologies. Nigel Gee collaborated with Oceanco to create Black Pearl’s hybrid propulsion system as well as other onboard systems such as waste heat recovery. It's no mystery that this incredible superyacht won the Sailing Superyacht of the Year Award for 2019.

While exploring the open oceans is sure to help you to adhere to social isolation protocols as you discover different frontiers, it is also something that demands a certain level of comfort - which only materials of the finest quality can meet. Cashmere, as a material, is as perfect for those on cruising vessels as it is for the world’s best sailing teams. And with our Cashmere Spa service, you can be assured that your investments will bear fruit for years to come. It is said that a sailor can only be as good as their equipment. 

While exploring the open oceans is sure to help you to adhere to social isolation protocols as you discover different frontiers, it is also something that demands a certain level of comfort - which only materials of the finest quality can meet. Cashmere, as a material, is as perfect for those on cruising vessels as it is for the world’s best sailing teams. 

And with our Cashmere Spa service, you can be assured that your investments will bear fruit for years to come. It is said that a sailor can only be as good as their equipment. 

While exploring the open oceans is sure to help you to adhere to social isolation protocols as you discover different frontiers, it is also something that demands a certain level of comfort - which only materials of the finest quality can meet. Cashmere, as a material, is as perfect for those on cruising vessels as it is for the world’s best sailing teams. And with our Cashmere Spa service, you can be assured that your investments will bear fruit for years to come. It is said that a sailor can only be as good as their equipment. 



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